CPPCLO3005 – Implement security risk or breach procedures Copy

CPPCLO3005 – Implement security risk or breach procedures Copy

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Element 4: Implement security risk or breach procedures

4.1. Work site is assessed for signs of security risk or breach during site access and cleaning, and agreed procedures and reporting requirements are followed as required

By the end of this chapter, the learner will be able to:

  • Assess work site for signs of security risk or breach during site access and cleaning
  • Follow agreed procedures and reporting requirements.

Assessing the work site for signs of security risk or breach

While working on site, you should remain alert and vigilant at all times. Although it is the responsibility of security staff to protect the work site, it is also incumbent on you to keep a watchful eye out for all security risks, as well as any potential breaches of security, such as break-in burglaries.

Specifically, you should:

Conduct a visual assessment of the site upon arrival

Listen carefully for any tell-tale noises

Listen to your instinct if you feel something is amiss; it is better to be safe than sorry.

Signs of a security breach include:

Broken windows

Broken doors

Broken equipment

Open drawers and cabinets

Lights on where they shouldn’t be

People or vehicles on site who shouldn’t be

Voices

Triggered alarms.

If you suspect there is or has been a security breach, alert all relevant security and site personnel immediately. Do not enter the site until given the all clear. Otherwise, you will put yourself and your organisation at risk.

The client will have their own preferences, procedures and requirements for reporting security risks (these should be detailed during your induction). Make sure you follow them to the letter.

4.2 – Risks to personal security are assessed and workplace procedures and reporting requirements are followed as required

By the end of this chapter, the learner will be able to:

  • Assess risks to personal security
  • Follow workplace procedures and reporting requirements.

Assessing risks to personal security

When working, your number one priority should be health and safety – not just your own, but everyone’s. Of course, completing the job itself is paramount, but this should never come at the cost of anyone’s wellbeing. For this reason, it is vital to assess all risks to personal security and wellbeing and to report these according to the client’s procedures.

Risks include (but are not limited to):

  • Biological and environmental contaminants
  • Chemical exposure via absorption, ingestion and inhalation
  • Chemical reactivity
  • Dust and fibre particulates
  • Electrical
  • Environmental allergens
  • Explosions
  • Fatigue
  • Fire
  • Excessive noise
  • Other people
  • Poor ventilation
  • Slips, trips and falls
  • Working in confined spaces.

To identify risks:

Explore the work site

Speak with colleagues, managers and supervisors

Read organisational policies and procedures

Read codes of conduct

Familiarise yourself with federal and state government regulations

Acquire and read incident and hazard logbooks.

Assessing risks

Assessing risks is vital if you are to successfully minimise the number (and the impact) of accidents during the cleaning process. Taking the time to assess each risk will not only enable you to more effectively prevent accidents, but also to develop a contingency plan for whenever incidents do occur.

To assess workplace risks, ask yourself questions including:

  • What is the risk itself?
    • e.g. risk of injury, illness, infection, etc.
  • Where is the risk located?
  • How many times, on average, do specific incidents occur as a result of the risk each year?
  • When, and in what circumstances, do these incidents tend to occur?
  • Who is most likely to be affected?

Remember, it is vital to follow all workplace procedures for assessing and reporting on-site risks. Such procedures are in place for a reason. The client will have developed them over a number of years, through trial and error, and will have tailored them specifically to the security concerns relevant to the work they do.

4.3 – Incidents involving personal security are reported immediately and workplace procedures are followed

By the end of this chapter, the learner will be able to:

  • Report incidents involving personal security immediately
  • Follow workplace procedures.

Reporting incidents involving personal security immediately

If ever an incident occurs that threatens your personal security, you must report it immediately and follow all relevant workplace procedures. This is important for several reasons. Not only do you need to safeguard your own – and your colleagues’ – wellbeing, the client also needs to be made aware of the incident so that they can isolate it and take steps to prevent it from occurring again.

You should, if you have followed procedure, already know who you need to report incidents to. There will usually be a dedicated work health and safety professional on site, or an appointed after-hours staff member, who deals with incidents of this kind. If you are unsure, however, of who to speak to, simply report to the nearest available staff member, or call the emergency after-hours number.

Incidents involving personal security may include:

Head injuries

Loss of consciousness

Fractures, sprains and dislocations

Scratches and cuts

Slips, trips and falls

Burns

Inhalation of toxic chemicals and other substances

Emergencies such as fires, flooding and gas leaks

Structural collapses

Faulty equipment

Physical confrontations.

When reporting the incident, you should specify:

What happened

What time the incident occurred

Where the incident occurred

Any injuries you have sustained

What you think caused – or may have caused – the incident to occur

How you dealt with the incident

The current status of the risk or hazard – i.e. does it still pose a risk?

What is important is that you follow all the client’s procedures for reporting incidents to the letter. Such procedures are in place for a reason. The client will have developed them over a number of years, through trial and error, and will have tailored them specifically to the security concerns relevant to the work they do.